For You, Our Activity Professionals

We are 3 days into National Activity Professional week. It is not without our Activities and Life Enrichment staff that we could provide care and cultivate community to the best of our ability. The teams that lead everything from bingo to imaginative programming developed specifically for a group of individuals, are the front lines of our care communities. They are the individuals who are charged, not with a clinical or medical checklist, but a personal one and are called to become relational with our residents in a way that is unique and quite remarkable. This is the team that has the least amount of specialized training yet hold the greatest impact on the day to day life of the community. They become friends, companions, and family, and they hear the stories of each life with great compassion, curiosity, and at times sorrow. If you work for a care organization and do not know these individuals, get to know them and thank them. Call them up, drop a card in their office, or give them words of gratitude the next time you see them.

Activity professionals are more than the staff hired by anyone community, this group also includes those who are contracted to work with a community for any length of time or amount of sessions. These individuals are true salmon swimming upstream, seeking to provide programming, connections, and joy, all the while not having a team to support them, or the stability of a single community. These individuals are often paid anywhere between 60-90 days after the end of their service, making their dedication, a sacrificial one. They too deserve a, “Thank you.” Send them a card or an email. Call them up or text them. Hire them!

The work of activity professionals is more than what meets the eye. The programs they offer can transform our communities. The type and richness of each program seeks to improve the quality of life for everyone. triggering a chain of events that leads to a reduction in medical needs and staff burn out, saving the community time and money.

Often when we think of programming in our care communities we think of the standards, bingo, trivia, movies, music, games. We think of a few people coming out for an hour or two, or a large crowd gathering, seeking connections. But programming can be so much more than that. It can be creative, playful, childlike (NOT childish!), and it can be truly tailored to the specified personalities, interests, and hopes of the individuals we serve. No matter what programs are offered, there should be a much greater goal than filling a calendar or creating a feel-good environment for the sales and marketing team. Activity professionals are called to help reach the spirit of each person they are asked to serve, to help them continue to become, instead of solely reminiscing about who they were. They are called to see beyond (just as all care staff and community members), to see what each person can do, and encourage that movement to take place. They are expected to know how to work with individuals with dementia, move a wheelchair down the hall, support the resident in completing a task associated with the program, and understand the complexities of the multiple needs of the community. They are asked to pray for and with the residents, to hear their stories, to support them emotionally. They do all of this with little support, continued education, and recognition. They do this in part-time roles without benefits, a small hourly wage and little to no options for growth. They are remarkable people, with hearts larger than mosts. When they struggle, their struggles lie mostly in the abandonment of the administration of the care community. When they succeed their wins are taken by others. Often they are given the tools, but not supported in implementing those tools. They receive lip-service and are scolded when the medical team does not see the beauty of their role. Now, in saying this there are exceptions, but I have not met many.

To all Activity Professionals, working in great and beautiful ways, I say, THANK YOU! Keep going! We need you! You enrich the lives of others in ways you may never be able to understand. Keep dreaming, imagining, playing, envisioning a better way to fill your calendar and the time you spend with those you serve.

In a perfect world, your community would support you in attending conferences, training in the programs you see as beautiful additions to your portfolio of work, and would allow you to live fully in your role. They would value you the same way they value their highest administration professionals. To the communities that support this vision, THANK YOU! I hope you become the industry leaders, the change-makers, the new “normal.” But, since we don’t live in a perfect world, how can I support you?

One way that I am attempting to support you, is by offering on-line training in Creative Engagement and Dementia, to help you become better activities and life enrichment professionals working in our care communities (dementia or not.) Since this is a week when we finally recognize your great beauty and work, if you are an activity professional, let me know, and I will give you a code to take my online training at a discounted rate. Because this post is not meant to be a sales pitch (we all hate those, don’t we?) the details will be linked here. But I do hope you consider joining me. Let us change the story of the activity professional together!

Because I cannot say it enough, we cannot say it enough, THANK YOU!

Published by Kathryne Fassbender

I am a Dementia and Creative Engagement Specialist. I am also the granddaughter of someone who lived with Vascular Dementia.

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