What is Missing in Our Accessibility Statements?

You know those thoughts that come to you, and NEVER leave? I have one of those thoughts on Accessibility floating through my mind now. Many organizations have “Accessibility Statements” on their websites and in their literature, but have you noticed what I have noticed? It is all about the physical. They make statements about how they are accessible via wheelchair or walker, and how they have systems in place for those who need assistance hearing, yet, what about those who need help because of memory, over sensory stimulation, and other invisible needs? This goes beyond being dementia friendly, beyond age-friendly, and beyond the physical wellbeing of each individual who walks through their doors or participates in their event. 

Having both of my parents certified in either Aging in Place or Universal Design, I understand the focus that can occur on the physical. I see how an organization must focus on these elements while constructing their physical presence. These statements while limiting are valuable and benefit everyone in the community. Statements regarding the whole person also need to be created. Don’t you agree? 

I dream of a vision statement looking something like this: 

[Our organization] has made an effort to make our main entrance accessible via a handicapped lift that will provide assistance getting from the street level to our building, where a large elevator can accommodate both wheelchair and walker to the various levels of our building. In addition to our entrance and elevator, our restrooms and community rooms are also accessible. We offer dedicated wheelchair seating when applicable. 

Through our main office/box office we offer any applicable ALD devices for any visitor to use during their visit. During our main stage events, we offer an ALS interpreter. 

Also through our main office/box office, we offer large print material for all events that will be available, as well as digital versions you may use via any electronic device to read at home before and after your visit. 

[Our organization] is a Purple Angel, and fully-trained in dementia and how to adapt and best serve those with memory loss. 

We believe that each person deserves to live fully and that their needs deserve to be attended to and their dignity should be upheld. If there is anything that interferes with your ease and enjoyment of our organization, please reach out to the closest staff member, and they will be able to assist you. 

We invite you to give us a call with any questions you have or would like to make us aware of any needs you may have prior to your visit. Our staff participates in yearly accessibility training on best practices for helping any guest enjoy their visit. If you need assistance while here [at organization] please feel free to seek out any staff member that will be throughout our building. 

This is nowhere near a perfect accessibility statement, as I attempt to draft something as wide and generic as possible, but I hope you get the gist. Please feel free to adapt and take whatever you feel fits your new accessibility statement. 

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